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Life history of Daphnia galeata in a hypertrophic reservoir and consequences of non=consumptive mortality for the initiation of a midsummer decline

Hülsmann, S. and Voigt, H. (2002) Life history of Daphnia galeata in a hypertrophic reservoir and consequences of non=consumptive mortality for the initiation of a midsummer decline. Freshwater Biology, 47, 2313-2324. ISSN 0046-5070.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2427.2002.00991.x

Abstract

Field and laboratory investigations were combined in a 2-year study on the initiation of a midsummer decline of Daphnia galeata Sars in a hypertrophic reservoir. Quantitative field samples were taken twice a week, and, adult and juvenile mortality rates were calculated. Patterns of reproduction and survival of daphnids born during spring and early summer under fluctuating food conditions were determined in life-table experiments. 2. The abundance of Daphnia increased strongly in early May and declined in June 1998 (midsummer decline). In 1999, Daphnia density increased only slowly in spring and remained constantly high throughout the summer. 3. Food conditions (concentrations of POC<30 m) for daphnids deteriorated in both years in response to increasing Daphnia densities, resulting in a clear-water phase of about 4 weeks. When Daphnia abundance declined in 1998, POC<30 m concentrations increased greatly, whereas in 1999 food conditions improved only slightly and Secchi depth remained high. 4. Survival of daphnids in life-table experiments decreased greatly after food became rare and was strongly reduced in those animals born during the clear-water phase compared with those born later. In addition, age at first reproduction was retarded during the clear-water phase, resulting in very low population growth rates. Survivorship patterns in life-table experiments suggest a strong impact of non-consumptive mortality on Daphnia population dynamics. 5. Field data of mortality point to differences in mortality patterns between years, probably resulting from different predation impacts of juvenile fish. In both years, however, adult mortality contributed substantially to overall mortality at the end of the clear-water phase. As bottom-up effects on D. galeata were very similar in both years, the significance of non-consumptive mortality on the initiation of midsummer declines appears to depend largely on recruitment patterns before the clear-

Item Type:Article
ID Code:11161
Deposited On:24 Nov 2011 01:00
Last Modified:24 Apr 2012 16:35

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